Tesla Cuts Pricing on Model S, Model X

                         Tesla Cuts Pricing on Model S, Model X
2017 Tesla Model S Manufacturer image — Tesla has slashed prices for the 100-kilowatt-hour versions of the Model S and Model X by as much as $5,000, rolling back the sting — and then some, in certain cases — for price hikes on those variants in place since last spring. Related: Tesla Model 3 Videos Show Control Screen in Action The reduction affects the 100D and P100D versions of the Model S and Model X, which are both all-wheel drive. The Model S 100D now starts at $95,200 including destination, down from the previous $98,700; the P100D runs $136,200, which is down from $141,200. The Model X is $97,200 for the 100D (down from $100,700) and $141,200 for the P100D (down from $146,200). Tesla credits the reduction to a cost-efficiency improvement of around 3 percent for production of its 100-kwh batteries. The automaker told Cars.com it will extend those savings to anyone with a custom 100D or P100D on order who hasn't taken delivery yet. That rolls back most of a price increase that dates back to April, when Tesla raised prices on the 100D and P100D versions of the Model S and Model X by $1,000 to $9,500, depending on the variant. Tesla said it periodically adjusts pricing on the cars, which don't follow traditional model-year changes (but still have model years that follow the date of manufacture). Prices have dropped $1,200 on the 100Ds and P100Ds since then. The prices come before tax incentives — most notably a $7,500 federal tax credit — and options, which range from Tesla's latest Autopilot system to third-row seating. Loaded up, the P100Ds top out around $150,000 before tax credits. They can also hit 60 mph in less than 3 seconds, which is quicker than many supercars. The move is the latest in a year of adjustments for the Model S and Model X. In March, Tesla discontinued the rear-drive Model S 60 and AWD Model S 60D, which were the cheapest versions of the Model S at the time. A month later, the automaker raised prices on the 100D and P100D but lowered them on four mid-level versions — the 75, 75D, 90 and 90D — for both the Model S and Model X. In June, Tesla discontinued the 90-kwh batteries, trimming the Model S and Model X to just the 75-kwh and 100-kwh batteries. The Model S has optional dual-motor AWD (hence, "D") on the 75-kwh version and standard AWD on the 100-kwh version, but Tesla signaled in July that it would discontinue the rear-drive Model S 75 by year's end. As of this writing, however, that car is still available to order on the automaker's website. Share